A tale of two rivers

The Galari/Lachlan River is the fourth-longest river in Australia. It flows through the lands of the Wiradyuri, Nari Nari and Yita Yita Nations starting on the Breadalbane Plains near Goulburn (696m above sea level), terminating at the Great Cumbung Swamp near Oxley on the Hay Plains (about 70m above sea level). The river is consideredContinue reading “A tale of two rivers”

Finding common ground

…it’s very pretty – one of the words that (with) landscapes we don’t use enough of… ERIC FISHER, FORMER MARSH GRAZIER, “Wilgara” Quambone Over the past six months of working on Pulse of the Wetland, I’ve been collecting stories from people who have a connection to the Marshes. It’s been a mix of identifying individualsContinue reading “Finding common ground”

Q&A with Of the Mosses’ Andrew Howe

I’ve been working collaboratively over the past 18 months with Andrew Howe (UK) on our Mosses and Marshes project, documenting my part of the project here. I share what I’ve been doing in a Q&A with Andrew on his website, Of the Mosses. READ IT HERE Read more about how Andrew is working on the raisedContinue reading “Q&A with Of the Mosses’ Andrew Howe”

Hidden sounds of the Marshes

When water returns to a wetland, you expect it to bring the sounds of life — insects, frogs and birds in full song, the trickle of water, wind in the treetops and shuffling through the reeds. You hear these things as soon as you step into the landscape. And so it was on my recentContinue reading “Hidden sounds of the Marshes”

Stories can shape the future

I’ve been telling and sharing people’s stories since my uni days of the late 1980s when I became a reporter, then editor, of the student newspaper. During my time as an ABC Radio Rural Reporter in the 1990s, I saw the radio connect people across a vast area of inland NSW; it was the storiesContinue reading “Stories can shape the future”

The things no one sees

It’s a way of understanding the seasons, the interrupters, the demise or reshaping of a landscape and all it contains. Recently, the Aboriginal concept of looking to listen, listening to see was flagged in conversations I’d been having. I hadn’t heard it phrased like this before, but I understood immediately that it’s a way ofContinue reading “The things no one sees”

Eye of the Corvus: the first ecoPULSE project

Well before ecoPULSE came into being, the work that set the framework for these art-based projects was Eye of the Corvus: Messenger of Truth. Highly intelligent, ravens and crows (corvids) reveal some of the complexities involved in survival, and the strategies other species employ to make their way in the world. Our worlds have co-evolvedContinue reading “Eye of the Corvus: the first ecoPULSE project”