Story contributions

At ecoPULSE we believe storytelling is a powerful form of communication as old as human-kind — fostering inclusion and connection, rekindling memories, reshaping ideas, clarifying misconceptions, and crafting new futures. Stories reflect us and shape us.

We’d love you to share your stories with us. We collect stories to inform our projects, to become part of our projects, and to create an online archive that can be accessed from anywhere.

Together, we can shape the future through our stories.

Kim V. Goldsmith

Here’s how you can do that, along with some tips on how to get the best recording.

Your stories will be shared on the ecoPULSE Story Map for our pilot project, Pulse of the Wetland (still in development). Providing you provide us with permission, audio recordings may be used in the development of video and sound works for exhibition. All contributors are credited.

CURRENT STORY CALLOUT: Pulse of the Wetland

Describe your first memory of the Macquarie Marshes.
What is it about the wetland/floodplain landscape of the area that you connect so strongly with?
What are your hopes for its future?

AUDIO STORIES

  1. At the start of your recording, tell us your name, what you do, where you are now, and how you came to be where you are now at the start of the recording. For example: “My name is John Smith. I’m a farmer from “Top Mile” Warren. I grew up at Nyngan and spent my childhood visiting family near the Marshes.”
  2. Respond to each of the questions, mentioning them in your answer if possible. Be as descriptive as you can.
  3. When you’re finished, save the recording on your phone, and give it a name if you want. Share/upload to a folder that you can access from your phone. The size of the file may be too big to email.
  4. Take or find a photo to go with your file – a photo of you or the environment you’re telling us about. Make sure you aren’t in shadow and that your chest to top of head fill the screen of your phone/camera with a little space around you – holding the phone sideways in landscape format. We’ll edit the photos on the Story Map into square format.
  5. Fill in the My Story form online – SEE THE SUBMIT MY STORY BUTTON. You’ll be able to submit your audio story and photo via the form – you’ll have to attach the audio file from the folder you saved it to from your phone. Don’t forget to hit Submit when you’ve finished.
  6. Alternatively, send us the recording and photo via via WeTransfer – but don’t forget to fill in the form so we know what we’re receiving. The email for sending via WeTransfer will be in the form.

WRITTEN STORIES

  1. Respond in writing to the questions above in 800 words or less, using Word or Google Docs.
  2. Take or find a photo of yourself or the environment you’re writing about. Make sure you aren’t in shadow and that your chest to top of head fill the screen of your phone/camera with a little space around you – holding the phone sideways in landscape format. We’ll edit the photos on the Story Map into square format.
  3. Fill in the My Story form online – SEE THE SUBMIT MY STORY BUTTON. You’ll be able to submit your written story and photo via the form. Don’t forget to hit Submit.

SUBMISSIONS CLOSE: 1 December 2020. Any questions about contributing a story can be sent to the Project Manager, Kim.

Tips for recording audio
  • On an iPhone use the Voice Memo app (or similar); on an Android phone use Voice Recorder (or similar). Save your recording as an audio file, share to a folder where you can access it to send via the form or WeTransfer.
  • Find someone to help you if you’re unsure of the steps.
  • Alternatively, use the online audio recorder, Voice Recorder Online, available on your favourite web browser. Save the recorded file to a folder on your computer where you can access it to send via the form or WeTransfer.
  • Sit in a quiet place to record your story, out of the wind. A little atmospheric sound such as birds singing or quiet water running isn’t a bad thing though, particularly if it’s relevant to the project and your story.
  • Don’t speak right into the microphone on your phone – treat it just like you would a phone call.
  • Use earbuds with an in-line mic if you have one – this can reduce the amount of ‘outside’ noise.

Read more about Pulse of the Wetland
Project overview
Blog posts