eco-PULSE Project Updates

Pulse of the Wetland This project has been developed on the traditional lands of the Wayilwan Nation, whose connections to the wetlands known as Maliyanga Ngurra*/ the Macquarie Marshes, dates back thousands of years. March 2020: Silent Symphony: the “Burrima” baselineMay 2020: Marking timeMay 2020: The autumnal crescendoJune 2020: The things no one seesJuly 2020:Continue reading “eco-PULSE Project Updates”

Q&A with Of the Mosses’ Andrew Howe

I’ve been working collaboratively over the past 18 months with Andrew Howe (UK) on our Mosses and Marshes project, documenting my part of the project here. I share what I’ve been doing in a Q&A with Andrew on his website, Of the Mosses. READ IT HERE Read more about how Andrew is working on the raisedContinue reading “Q&A with Of the Mosses’ Andrew Howe”

Hidden sounds of the Marshes

When water returns to a wetland, you expect it to bring the sounds of life — insects, frogs and birds in full song, the trickle of water, wind in the treetops and shuffling through the reeds. You hear these things as soon as you step into the landscape. And so it was on my recentContinue reading “Hidden sounds of the Marshes”

Stories can shape the future

I’ve been telling and sharing people’s stories since my uni days of the late 1980s when I became a reporter, then editor, of the student newspaper. During my time as an ABC Radio Rural Reporter in the 1990s, I saw the radio connect people across a vast area of inland NSW; it was the storiesContinue reading “Stories can shape the future”

All earthlings are kin in the deepest sense: a QandA with Andrew Howe

Andrew Howe is a visual artist, based in Shrewsbury UK, using walking as inspiration for painting, drawing, photography, books and digital media. He explores how people interact with their environment, and how layers of historical activities in the landscape create the identity of places. Andrew is working collaboratively with me, Kim V. Goldsmith, through ourContinue reading “All earthlings are kin in the deepest sense: a QandA with Andrew Howe”

On wing and water

The Macquarie Marshes are recognised internationally as a birding ‘hotspot’, despite there not being many accessible places to get into the heart of the wetlands*. Ninety per cent of the Marshes are privately owned, and short of public road access points and travelling stock routes (see p45 Bird Watching Trail Guide), there aren’t too manyContinue reading “On wing and water”

The things no one sees

It’s a way of understanding the seasons, the interrupters, the demise or reshaping of a landscape and all it contains. Recently, the Aboriginal concept of looking to listen, listening to see was flagged in conversations I’d been having. I hadn’t heard it phrased like this before, but I understood immediately that it’s a way ofContinue reading “The things no one sees”

The autumnal crescendo

As the chill of winter touched the Western Plains, I headed north again for another weekend in the Macquarie Marshes. It was early May. This was to be a quick, overnight trip to document another stage in what I hoped to be the wetland’s recovery from years of drought. …the silence of the cold autumnContinue reading “The autumnal crescendo”

Marking time

I’ve started to lose track of how many days I’ve been at home now as part of our contribution to the Covid19 containment measures. Each day is much the same and much like the day before. Mind you, the only real difference to pre-Covid times is my week is no longer punctuated by coffees andContinue reading “Marking time”

Silent symphony: the “Burrima” baseline

What would you expect to hear at dusk on the edge of a wetland? A chorus of frogs, chirruping birds settling down to roost for the night, the mechanical whirr of various insects, interjections from some of the noisier avian species? Don’t forget the whine of mosquitoes. Would you expect to hear silence? As PulseContinue reading “Silent symphony: the “Burrima” baseline”